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Inference and Control in Routing Games

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Abstract:
This talk presents inference, control, and game-theoretic algorithms developed to improve traffic flow in transportation networks. First, traffic estimation algorithms using crowdsourced mobile data will be presented. These rely on applications of convex optimization to inverse modeling problems involving partial differential equations (PDEs). The implementation of these algorithms on mobile phones increase the accuracy of traffic information. Second, the talk presents algorithms to control transportation infrastructure assets (metering lights, traffic lights in the arterial networks, variable speed limits etc.). These algorithms rely on adjoint-based optimization of PDEs in discretized form. Finally, we investigate disruptions in demand due to the rapid expansion of the use of “selfish routing” apps.  These disruptions cause congestion and make traditional approaches of traffic management less effective. Game theoretic approaches to demand modeling will be presented. These models encompass heterogeneous users (some using routing information, some not) that share the same network and compete for the same commodity (capacity). Results will be presented for static loading, based on Nash-Stackelberg games, and in the context of repeated games, to account for the fact that routing algorithms learn the dynamics of the system over time when users change their behavior.

Type of Seminar:
Control Seminar Series
Speaker:
Prof. Alex Bayen
University of California, Berkeley
Date/Time:
Oct 30, 2017   17:15 h
Location:

ETZ E 8
Contact Person:

No downloadable files available.
Biographical Sketch:
Alexandre Bayen is the Liao-Cho Professor of Engineering at UC Berkeley, in the departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Civil and Environmental Engineering. He is the Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies, and a Faculty Scientist in Mechanical Engineering at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he is the Director of the Transportation Initiative. He received a BS from Ecole Polytechnique, France, and an MS and PhD from Stanford University.  He has worked at NASA, and at the Department of Defense in France, where he holds the rank of Major. He has published two books and over 200 peer refereed journal and conference publications. His research has been covered hundreds of times in the mainstream media. He is the recipient of several awards, including CAREER (NSF), PECASE (White House), Ruberti Prize (IEEE), Huber Prize (ASCE), TRANNY (CTF) and Gilbreth Lecture (NAE).