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376-1217-00L
Rehabilitation Engineering I: Motor Functions

Professor(en):
R. Riener
Betreuer:
Vorlesung:
Link zum Kurskatalog
Spring 2017
Webseite:
Ziele:
Provide theoretical and practical knowledge of principles and applications used to rehabilitate individuals with motor disabilities.
Vorlesungslevel:
D-ITET Master, Systems and Control specialization
Supplementary Core Courses
Voraussetzungen:
Target Group: Students of higher semesters and PhD students of - D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK - Biomedical Engineering - Medical Faculty, University of Zurich Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
Inhalt:
“Rehabilitation” is the (re)integration of an individual with a disability into society. Rehabilitation engineering is “the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disability”. Such handicaps can be classified into motor, sensor, and cognitive (also communicational) disabilities. In general, one can distinguish orthotic and prosthetic methods to overcome these disabilities. Orthoses support existing but affected body functions (e.g., glasses, crutches), while prostheses compensate for lost body functions (e.g., cochlea implant, artificial limbs). In case of sensory disorders, the lost function can also be substituted by other modalities (e.g. tactile Braille display for vision impaired persons). The goal of this lecture is to present classical and new technical principles as well as specific examples applied to compensate or enhance mainly motor deficits. Modern methods rely more and more on the application of multi-modal and interactive techniques. Multi-modal means that visual, acoustical, tactile, and kinaesthetic sensor channels are exploited by displaying the patient with a maximum amount of information in order to compensate his/her impairment. Interaction means that the exchange of information and energy occurs bi-directionally between the rehabilitation device and the human being. Thus, the device cooperates with the patient rather than imposing an inflexible strategy (e.g., movement) upon the patient. Multi-modality and interactivity have the potential to increase the therapeutical outcome compared to classical rehabilitation strategies. In the 1 h exercise the students will learn how to solve representative problems with computational methods applied to exoprosthetics, wheelchair dynamics, rehabilitation robotics and neuroprosthetics. http://www.sms.mavt.ethz.ch/education/lectures/RehabilitationEngineering
Dokumentation:

Lecture notes will be distributed at the beginning of the lecture (1st session)