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Discrete State Estimators for Systems on a Lattice

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Abstract:
The problem of estimating discrete variables in a class of deterministic transition systems where the continuous variables are available for measurement is addressed. This simplified scenario has practical interest, for example, in the case of decentralized multi-robot systems. In these systems, the continuous variables represent physical quantities such as the position and velocity of a robot, while discrete variables may represent the state of the logical system that is used for control and coordination. A novel approach to the estimation of discrete variables using basic lattice theory is proposed that overcomes some of the severe complexity issues encountered in previous work. The proposed estimator is then constructed for a multi-robot system performing a cooperative assignment task.

http://www.cds.caltech.edu/~ddomitilla/
Type of Seminar:
Public Seminar
Speaker:
Mrs Domitilla Del Vecchio
Control and Dynamical Systems, California Institute of Technology
Date/Time:
Sep 21, 2004   17:15
Location:

ETH-Zentrum, ETZ E6, Gloriastrasse 35, 8006 Zurich
Contact Person:

Prof. M. Morari
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Biographical Sketch:
Domitilla Del Vecchio is a PhD candidate in the Control and Dynamical Systems department at the California Institute of Technology. Her research interests include modeling, estimation, and control of hybrid systems, with applications to large scale multi-agent systems, estimation, modeling, and recognition of human motion, and mobile sensor networks in human environments. Her PhD work involves the design of state estimators for hybrid system that exploit partial order theory to reduce complexity. Applications of the approach include large scale multi-robot systems, dynamic resource allocation problems, and the recognition of human motion.